Tag Archives: Hout Bay

Restaurant Review: Quentin at Oakhurst Barn serves Cape Country Cuisine, blends Brit & Boer in his eclectic decor!

 

From never having been to eat at Quentin at Oakhurst Barn in Hout Bay, I was lucky to be part of a group of friends who love it so much that I enjoyed one dinner and a Sunday lunch, offering Cape Country Cuisine, both in the same week, earlier this month. I was astounded at this restaurant gem, the best in Hout Bay but also the most hidden, tucked away in a little lane off the Main Road on the way to Constantia, the popularity of this restaurant based purely on word of moth reputation. Continue reading →

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Tintswalo Kitchen Restaurant opens to local diners, for lunch and dinner, kitchen headed up by former Shortmarket Club chef!

 

 

Exciting news in these Covid Lockdown times is that Tintswalo Atlantic, at the foot of Chapman’s Peak and offering the best restaurant view in Cape Town, is reopening its restaurant tomorrow 29 July, now named Tintswalo Kitchen, specifically focusing on the local market, but serving its in-house hotel guests too. Continue reading →

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Corona Virus: Lockdown Journey Journal, Day 38 of Level 3, 8 July 2020.

 

Wednesday 8 July 2020, Day 38 of Level 3, after 66 days of Levels 5 and 4 😷

Corona Gratitude 🙏

#Grateful for a most wonderful day, all the way through, with much storytelling; for amazing weather at 21C, and even warmer at 23C as I drove home now from Hout Bay, with a strong Bergwind before tomorrow’s downpour; for a tightly scheduled morning, my writing followed by a quick walk through Camps Bay and the purchase of cat treats at Absolute Pets; for buying more plants and seeds at LandsCape Art Garden Centre, including carrots, peas, and radish, getting brave now; for meeting Jenny Stephens and her friend Linda French, taking a Waterfront Granger Bay walk with coffee/tea at The Grand on the Beach; a wonderful hour and a bit in the sun, laughing at each other’s stories and each of us learning from another; my visit to the dentist being a good thing, despite no more toothache, the X-ray showing a serious abscess, which had to be taken care off, and the tooth ultimately needing a crown; for a fabulous sunset; for a good Discovery Vitality Gameboard play; for the most enjoyable, fun, funny, mouthwatering dinner with my Danish friends and Melanie Davidow at Quentin at Oakhurst Barn in Hout Bay, my first visit here, leaving for home after midnight; and for being happy and healthy. 🙏💙 Continue reading →

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Corona Virus: Lockdown Journey Journal, Day 5 of Level 3, 5 July 2020.

 

Sunday 5 July 2020, Day 35 of Level 3 after 66 days at Levels 5 and 4 😷

Corona Gratitude 🙏

#Grateful for a typical Cape Town day, at least two seasons in one day, with light rain most of this morning and lovely sunshine late this afternoon; for it being pleasant to go for a walk at lunchtime, combining Camps Bay with a Bakoven walk in one go; for the support I received about the cribbing of my Restaurant Sit-Down list; for the invitation by Juandre to enjoy a Jasmine tea at Bootlegger Bakoven; for a day without any toothache or any other pain, almost 24 hours without a painkiller ❤️❤️❤️; for feeling on top of the world after 9,5 hours sleep, a record for me, clearly what I needed; for visiting DARG in Hout Bay, from which I adopted Minsky, to fetch a tablet for her; for an hour spent at my ‘third home’ La Parada, my home of dancing, but there was none of that today; for shopping at Woolworths in Hout Bay, buying ingredients for a soup; for not being stopped at a massive roadblock in Hout Bay, passing through it in both directions 🙏; for a lovely sunset; for loving the Beethoven and Mozart played by flautists Sir James and Lady Galway in Zürich with Daniel Hope at Hope @ Home on Tour, lovely happy lively music which reflects how I feel today compared to yesterday, and enjoying it with my cousin Ulrike in two different countries and hemispheres; for being requested by two restaurant owners to assist them in two issues affecting our local restaurant industry; and for being happy and healthy 🙏💙

On my walk I saw Sunset Sessions having put out tables and chairs, to create sit-down opportunities. I almost literally bumped into Howard in Bakoven, coming around the same corner on Beta Road from different directions. Juandre from Bootlegger not only invited me to tea but also helped me to look at the Cape Town Eats Facebook Group now that I have been deleted from it…. the Group owner having cribbed from my Sit-Down Restaurant list on my Blog without permission.

What a transformation at La Parada for a Sunday afternoon, few cars outside, all tables set up on ‘our’ dance floor of days gone by but no dancing allowed, and DJ Rene Tanguy playing there, seemingly still angry with me about the honesty of my feedback about the music he plays these days, not making eye contact or acknowledgimg my presence there at all. What was weird was that he turned his back on his ‘audience’, the diners! But the staff was lovely, and having an appetite for the first time in two days, I ordered fried calamari. Mmmmmm 💙

I have some writing to do for one of the restaurant owners this evening, he going to court tomorrow on behalf of the restaurant industry.

I’m very happy with my pot of home-made vegetable soup.

So much 💙💙💙💙 in the sky over Camps Bay today.

SA Corona Status : 196750 cases 3199 deaths 😷😢

FitBit 12000 steps 9 km 👣

Lovemylife ❤️

 

I posted a separate post about plagiarism from parts of my Blogposts on Facebook without permission or credit, this having happened twice in the past month, which created a lively discussion. The latest perpetrator is Pamela McOnie of Cape Town Eats, cribbing the Atlantic Seaboard section of my list of Sit-Down restaurants that have reopened:

‘Dear Friends

It’s the second time in a month that a section of one of two of my Blogposts, being lists of Restaurant closures and Reopened Restaurants, has been cribbed and shared without permission or credit to the source.

Even worse is that the Admin of the Sea Point Community Group gave permission to one of the offenders to do so. When I questioned him on this, this was his reply:

Chris Von Ulmenstein when something gets posted on this group, it becomes public information. Admin has the right to allow any member to copy, paste and share if they deem fit to do so. Since when do you own the sole rights to publish which Restaurants are open for business in Cape Town, and specifically the Sea Point and Atlantic Seaboard area?’

Surely a Facebook Group Admin does not own my content and cannot give a third party permission to commit what is outright plagiarism? 😱😢😡‘

 

The Corona Virus Lockdown (Level 5), announced by our President Cyril Ramaphosa earlier to commence on 27 March and to continue until 16 April, subsequently extended to 30 April, lowered to Level 4 from 1 May, and lowered to Level 3 from 1 June, is an unprecedented event in my lifetime. I am posting my daily Facebook post to journal this Corona Lockdown Journey, perhaps to serve as material for a future Book.

About Chris von Ulmenstein

Chris von Ulmenstein, WhaleTales Blog: www.chrisvonulmenstein.com/blog Tel +27 082 55 11 323 Twitter:@Ulmenstein Facebook: Chris von Ulmenstein Instagram: @Chrissy_Ulmenstein

 

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Travel & Tourism: Top 10 things to do and see in Camps Bay, Cape Town!

I was invited by journalist Andrew Thompson of UK-based Culture Trip to submit an article about the Top 10 Things to do and see in Camps Bay in Cape Town. This is what I wrote just prior to the Corona Virus Lockdown:

Continue reading →

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Corona Virus Lockdown: Food Offering and Delivery very tightly controlled, yet some chefs and restaurants have found ways to do it!

 

I have written previously how the restaurant industry is suffering tremendously, both in being able to pay its bills due to lack of cash flow, and the responsibility it has to keep paying staff, receiving UIF payments for staff appearing to be a difficult process, understandable as every employer in the country is trying to keep head above water and therefore submitting claims. From wanting to jump in to prepare meals to deliver, and thereby keep some staff employed and some cash flowing, most restaurant were disappointed to discover that this was against the Lockdown Law.  Yet a handful of chefs and food suppliers have managed to receive an Essential Service certificate, and are preparing food offerings, which they are delivering to clients’ homes or offering on a collection basis. Licensed alcohol-selling restaurants appear to be experiencing the biggest problems when it comes to food delivery permission, even though they do not offer alcohol delivery. Continue reading →

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Corona Virus: My Lockdown Journey Journal, Day 3, 29 March 2020.

 

Sunday 29 March 2020, Day 14 of SA Corona Virus, Day 3 of Lockdown 😷

Corona Gratitude 🙏

#Grateful for another beautiful day, almost wind-free; for such peace and quiet, without Sunday morning motorcycle drive-bys; to have access to two free largest German TV channels to watch movies; to have Netflix; and to love my home, and how romantic it is to light the candles for me, myself, and I when the sun goes down. 🙏💙

I slept very late, after late binging on a Netflix series, and had to finish it later today. I will not go there again, as I did far too little dancing, and got myself hooked in, not me at all. Tomorrow I’ll be sitting down and starting to write a book I have planned, in addition to the Corona Virus Journey Journal.

It was quiet on Victoria Road today , I only seeing one couple and two Homeless persons. But at least 20 cars drove by in one hour from about 14h00, in the direction of Bakoven/Hout Bay, filled with family and even a dog, all of them private vehicles and not Essential Services ones. The most cars I’ve seen in three days.

I’m quite shocked at the nastiness coming to the fore from a number of ‘Corona captives’ who have nothing better to do than Facebook bitch. Had to block two such bitches reacting to my post of yesterday, one not even a FB friend.

I was impressed when I saw Camps Bay CSI and a security company checking for homeless persons living on open erfs, like one next door to us (nothing luckily) and opposite five buildings further down Victoria Road, where some homeless persons are living. 👏👏👏

It seems that my Argentinian problem of next door has gone, wondering how they were evacuated legally.

My Portuguese friend Paula, whom I met on the Camino last year, wrote about their Corona restrictions:

The government tell us to stay at home, because he “believes” on the good behaviour of the portuguese. He gives us advices to be careful. We must go outside only to go to the supermarket or the pharmacy’.

I had Kfm reception problems yesterday and today, and was told by them that two undersea cables are damaged, affecting internet performance.

 

Thought of the day

The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks.

I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance.

We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood.

As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that.

First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do.

You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days.

You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it.

You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy.

You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom…

You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest.

Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes.

You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again.

You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training.

You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all.

You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules.

You will count all the things you do not need.

The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises.

Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant.

Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month?

You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair.

You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.

Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce.

Many children will be conceived.

Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy.

Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die.

You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU.

You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps.

You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.

Class, however, will make all the difference. Being locked up in a house with a pretty garden or in an overcrowded housing project will not be the same. Nor is being able to keep on working from home or seeing your job disappear. That boat in which you’ll be sailing in order to defeat the epidemic will not look the same to everyone nor is it actually the same for everyone: it never was.

At some point, you will realise it’s tough. You will be afraid. You will share your fear with your dear ones, or you will keep it to yourselves so as not to burden them with it too.

You will eat again.

We’re in Italy, and this is what we know about your future. But it’s just small-scale fortune-telling. We are very low-key seers.

If we turn our gaze to the more distant future, the future which is unknown both to you and to us too, we can only tell you this: when all of this is over, the world won’t be the same.

© Francesca Melandri 2020’

 

Corona stats: 1280 cases 2 deaths. Highest Western Cape (310 cases) concentration is in Cape Town (256 cases), and on the Atlantic Seaboard (106) and Southern Suburbs (98).

FitBit 5000 steps 3,5 km 👣

Lovemylife❤️

 

The Corona Virus Lockdown, announced by our President Cyril Ramaphosa earlier this week to commence on 27 March and to continue until 16 April, is an unprecedented event in my lifetime. I am posting my daily Facebook post to journal this Corona Lockdown Journey, perhaps to serve as material for a future Book.

 

Chris von Ulmenstein, WhaleTales Blog: www.chrisvonulmenstein.com/blog Tel +27 082 55 11 323 Twitter:@Ulmenstein Facebook: Chris von Ulmenstein Instagram: @Chrissy_Ulmenstein

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Tintswalo Atlantic fired up to open its doors on 1 October, after devastating fire earlier this year!

On Tuesday evening I was fortunate to enjoy a stay-over at the beautifully located five-star Tintswalo Atlantic on the Atlantic Ocean, at the foot of Chapman’s Peak in Cape Town. The invitation was to try out the newly rebuilt hotel, of which the public rooms were destroyed by a devastating fire in February this year, with accommodation suites renovated, and to provide feedback and suggestions ahead of the reopening of Tintswalo Atlantic on 1 October. A number of media representatives, travel trade representatives, as well as past guests have been invited to experience the Hotel during September.  Continue reading →

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‘The Kissing Booth’ Netflix film sequel shoot brings Los Angeles to Camps Bay!

I walk in Camps Bay every day, not always knowing what I will see or experience. Yesterday the beachfront was a hive of activity, with a film shoot for what I learnt was for sequels 2 and 3 of a 2018 movie ‘The Kissing Booth’, aired on Netflix. Continue reading →

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Cape of Fires: Lion’s Head and Tintswalo Atlantic Lodge victims of recent fires!

It was a shock to wake up to the news that the main restaurant, lounge, and kitchen building caught fire earlier this morning at Tintswalo Atlantic Lodge, the Boutique Hotel beautifully located at the foot of Chapman’s Peak, and looking onto The Sentinel mountain in Hout Bay. It is the second fire at the lodge in four years. This follows the devastating fire on Lion’s Head just over a week ago.  Continue reading →

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