Tag Archives: jewellery

Lion’s Head firefighters Sweet Service and Celtic Cove Sour Service Awards!

Lions Head fire Whal CottageThe Sweet Service Award goes to the 130 Cape Town Fire Department firefighters and the Volunteer Wildfire Services, which were instrumental in combating the fire on Lion’s Head and Signal Hill on Tuesday, and from spreading to the houses of De Wet Road in Bantry Bay, despite an unusually strong South-Easter.  Fighting subsequent fires this week, fanned by the South Easter, in Kommetjie and other areas of Cape Town, is also commended.  Continue reading →

New Watershed in V&A Waterfront showcases ‘Africa’s largest collection of craft and design’!

Watershed logo Whale CottageThe V&A Waterfront has completely transformed what was previously the Blue Shed near the V&A Market on the Wharf, renaming it Watershed (a corny name which tries to be clever, but it does not reflect at all what is inside the building), and creating a showcase of 168 crafters, designers, and more under one roof.

I was invited to attend the official opening of Watershed on Watershed Star Whale CottageThursday evening, and so were thousands of others, as the traffic jam inside the V&A was unbelievable, a trip between Kloof Street and the parking garage opposite Watershed taking 45 minutes traveling time!  There was no warning on radio nor through the V&A’s electronic Continue reading →

Cape Town Design Route 2011: permanent showcase of the Cape’s design best

I was very impressed with the Design Indaba Expo, which was held in the Cape Town International Convention Centre last weekend, representing the best in the South African design industry, and in Cape Town specifically, 260 designers exhibiting their work.  At the exhibition the latest map of the Cape Town Design Route was launched.

It is exciting to see that the Cape Town Design Route has more than doubled to 59 designers, and their work is permanently showcased at their studios, via a map that provides contact and location details of designers in the City area, in the southern and northern suburbs, on the Atlantic Seaboard, and in the Winelands and beyond.

The designers on the Cape Town Design Route 2011 are the following:

*   BlueCollarWhiteCollar offers shirts, using the highest quality fabrics.  Lifestyle on Kloof, 50 Kloof Street.  Tel (021) 426-1921

*   Cabinetworks are master kitchen and furniture makers. 229 Bree Street. Tel (021) 422-3830

*   Cape Craft & Design Institute promotes Western Cape designers of homeware, jewellery, gifts, fashion and décor.  75 Harrington Street.  Tel (021) 461-1488

*   Carrol Boyes is well known for its pewter, stainless steel and chrome-plated alloy homeware, tableware and accessories.  43 Rose Street, Bo-Kaap. Tel (021) 424-8263

*   Continent Africa sells the Africa Tee to raise funds for its running costs, being an economic-political think-tank.  59 Harrington Street.  Tel (021) 464-4580

*   Cupcake Country sells sewing kits so that one can make cupcakes and other craft (right).  10 A Jagersfontein Lane, Oranjezicht.  Tel (021) 461-4421

*   freeRange Jewels offers an alternative jewellery range.  Cape Quarter, 27 Somerset Road, Green Point. Tel (021) 418-3607

*   Give it Bag designs handbags, laundry bags, and wine coolers made from recycled polypropylene bags and cotton.   Canterbury Studios, 35 Wesley Street, Gardens.  Tel (021) 465-9852

*    Good Clothing designs simple but trendy clothing. 101 Burleigh House, 24 Barrack Street.  Tel (021) 461-6599

*   Indalo Project creates employment for craft artists, producing home decor, furniture, lights and gifts,   65 Rose Street, Bo-Kaap.  Tel (021) 801-4775

*   Inkheart Jewellery Design designs jewellery with a personal touch, inspired by childhood stories and memories.  17 Bayview Avenue, Tamboerskloof.  Tel (021) 423-9571.

*   Monkeybiz makes high-quality bespoke beaded designer items.  43 Rose Street, Bo-Kaap.  Tel (021)  426-0145

*   Peddersen + Lennard makes lighting, furniture, and other items on commission (left).   37 Barrack Street.  Tel (021)   447-2020

*   Pierre Cronje makes unique and timeless furniture, using the best timbers.   Cape Quarter, 27 Somerset Road, Green Point.  Tel (021)  425-0374

*   Projekt is a crochet and skills training project, making scarves, toys, jewellery, cushions and homeware.   6B Malan Street, Gardens.  Tel (021) 422-0739

*   Spilt Milk is an easy-to-wear men’s and women’s clothing range.  36 Upper Orange Street, Oranjezicht.  Tel 079 358 2072

*   Streetwires Artist Collective offers employment, making African wire and bead craft-art.  Tel (021) 426-2475

*   thisarmy builds ‘apps’.  71 Roeland Street.  Tel 082 379 8180

*   Township Patterns makes colourful fabrics, and fun and easy-to-wear garments.   Cape Quarter, 27 Somerset Road, Green Point. Tel (021) 418-0388

*   Urbanative Jewels makes once-off jewellery pieces.  Gold of Africa Museum, 96 Strand Street.  Tel 082 770 9788

*   Van der Merwe Miszewski Architects pursue excellence in design.   163 Bree Street.  Tel (021) 423-5829.

*   Woodhead’s makes leather and natural fabric products.  29 Caledon Street. Tel (021) 461-7185

*   …XYZ Design has the wind-up radio as one of its design highlights.  Cape Quarter, 27 Somerset Road, Green Point.  Tel (021) 421-7236

*   Clementina Ceramics sell individually handmade earthenware products.  Old Biscuit Mill, 375 Albert Road, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 447-1398

*   Design Afrika sells hand-woven items made from river reeds, cotton, mountain grasses and palm fibres, combined with leather, glass and plastic.  42 Hares Avenue, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 448- 9761

*   Firepetals makes handcrafted art jewellery with a South African flair.  59 Roodebloem Street, Woodstock.   Tel (021) 447-2025

*   Frieda Lühl Jewellery makes simple and elegant jewellery.  30 Roodebloem Street, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 448-1408.

*   Haldane Martin makes contemporary furniture (left).   12 Aberdeen Street, Woodstock.  tel (021) 448-0999

*   Liesel Trautman makes porcelain homeware, each item individually finished.   114 Lower Main Road, Observatory.  Tel 073 275 9494

*   Maike Valcarcel designs Africa-inspired jewellery, using gold, pebbles, silver and felt.  30 Roodebloem Road, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 790-8849

*   Recreate makes furniture and lighting from discarded junk.  368 Albert Road, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 447-0007.

*   Sway sells comfortable and easy wearing women’s clothing.   Woodstock Industrial Centre, 66 Albert Road, Woodstock.  tel (021) 447-5999.

Trip Handbags and Accessories makes durable, funky and functional handbags.   9 Harrington Road, Fish Hoek.  Tel (021) 785-1225

*   Zizamele Ceramics makes African-inspired ceramics (right).  Corner Chasmay and Kommetjie Roads, Sunnydale, Noordhoek.  Tel (021 789-1491

*   Chimpel makes luxury leather accessories in a classic design.  85 Sixth Avenue, Rondebosch East.   Tel (021) 697-5875.

*   David Krut Publishing publishes books on architecture, art and design.   Montobello Design Centre, 31 Newlands Avenue, Newlands.   Tel (021) 685-0676

*   Dear.Rae.With.Love designs jewellery using enamel, fabric, silver, wood and found objects.  12 Peak Drive. Pinelands.  Tel (021) 531-2940.

*   Diane Harper makes coasters and pendants.  36 Forest Drive, Pinelands.  Tel ()21) 532-3758

*   Emma Anne is a range of distinctive contemporary jewellery.   6 Chippenham Road, Kenilworth.  Tel (021) 762-5465

*   Flick Glass and My China combines ceramics and art to express her love of fynbos and small animals.   24 Dartmouth Road, Muizenberg.   Tel (021) 789- 9119

*   Janine Binneman Jewellers makes custom jewellery.   25 Almora Circle, Tokai.  Tel (021) 715-6178

*   John Bauer uses antique crochet cloth, linen and lace in his ceramics.  35 Greenwood Road, Claremont.  Tel (021) 683-7851

*   Matblac makes men’s leather apparel.   1 The Meadows, 12 Meadow Lane, Constantia.  Tel (021) 794- 5723

*   Mielie makes fun bags.   31 Newlands Avenue, Newlands.  Tel (021) 686-2026.

*    Skermunkel Design Studio makes fun, quirky and sentimental jewellery inspired by everyday play and childhood storybooks, using enamel, silver and antique cutlery.   44 Palmer Road, Muizenberg.  Tel (021) 788-8577.

*   Tania Babb Ceramics makes fun sculptures (right).   39 Wolfe Street, Wynberg.  Tel (021) 797-7144

*   The Potters Workshop makes functional ceramic art.  Toledo Close, Capricorn Park, Muizenberg.   Tel (021) 709-0212

*   Will Martin Projects makes handmade ceramic products.  35 Greenwood Road, Harfield Village, Claremont.  Tel 079 663 0532

*   Woo-Men Plush Toys makes fun toys for kids and ‘kidults’.  37 Cromer Road, Muizenberg.  Tel (021) 788-8249

*   IDESO is a specialist product design consultancy.   Unit 4 Canal Edge, Three Tyger Waterfront, Carl Cronje Drive, Tygervalley.  Tel (021) 914-8444

*   Coast & Koi is a range of glamorous and comfortable shoes.   2A Vredefort, 268 Beach Road, Sea Point.  tel (021) 434-7597

*   Collect makes boutique jewellery.   3 Saunders Court, Saunders Road, Bantry Bay.   Tel (021) 439-5262.

*   Alpacafelt makes fashion and interior design items from alpaca fibre.  Novello Alpaca Farm, Rietvlei, Barrydale Road, Montagu.  Tel (023) 614-2674

*   Elizabeth Galloway Young Designers runs a fashion design training programme.   26 Techno Road, Technopark, Stellenbosch.   Tel (021) 880-0775

*   FACT makes a range of canvas and leather bags representing township life in visuals.   Jackal  River Farm, Houw Hoek, Elgin.  Tel 082 491 5243

*   Lady Peculiar makes sterling silver jewellery with romantic, organic, nostalgic, emotional and playful elements.

*   The African Queen Studio makes chandeliers and lamps with natural materials.   1 Grewe Street, McGregor.  Tel (023) 625-1843

*   The Fringe Arts is a collective of the work of 70 designers.  Spier, R310, Lynedoch Road, Stellenbosch.  tel (021) 809-1142

*   Wonki Ware  makes bright and bold pottery.  42 York Street, George.  Tel (044) 884-1883

Cape Town Design Route 2011: www.designindaba.com   Products of the above designers can be bought online.

Chris von Ulmenstein, Whale Cottage Portfolio:  www.whalecottage.com   Twitter: @WhaleCottage

Design Indaba Expo 2011 showcases Cape Town as design capital of South Africa!

Yesterday I became excited about another dimension of Cape Town – I attended the Design Indaba Expo, the first time that I have attended any aspect of the Design Indaba in its 16 year history.   I am so sorry that I was not better informed about this amazing event in the local newspapers or on radio, and had it not been for Twitter I would not have known about it.   I was blown away by the quality and diversity of design, by mainly Cape Town based designers, in the jam-packed Cape Town International Convention Centre exhibition hall, and must congratulate Ravi Naidoo and his Design Indaba team for the excellent organisation, and leading-edge design on display.  I would urge all design-lovers in Cape Town to visit the Design Indaba Expo this weekend.

There is such an overwhelming number of exhibitors, in relatively small stands, that one blindly moves from one stand to another, trying to not miss anything in the vast hall.   No exhibitor map or list is provided when one buys the ticket outside the hall, and the Design Indaba Info stand is in the centre of the hall (not visible when one enters), and I only saw it near the end of my long walk through the exhibition.   Here I was able to obtain a “Visitors Guide”, which lists each of the roughly 250 exhibitors, and contains the floor plan, so that one can find the exhibitors, as well as the programme for the fashion shows and film festival, forming part of the Design Indaba programme.  Designers were chosen by a panel of industry experts, the Visitors Guide explains.   What I did observe is that many designers are brand new at their design businesses, and rather poor at their marketing, not having business cards and/or brochures with them, or having handed all of them out during the first day of the Expo.  Pierre le Roux was one of the most interesting designers at the Expo, in my opinion, but has no business card and not even a website.  Pierre described his furniture as being works of art more than functional seating.  To obtain further information and contact details of all the designers, one has to buy  a “Buyers Guide” at R100, which I decided to do, to use at a later stage – sadly Pierre’s details are not in the Buyers’ Guide either.  This information deficiency was the only flaw in the Expo that I experienced.   

Near the entrance was an impactful rainbow-coloured display to attract attention to Cape Town’s bid for Design Capital of the world in 2014.  Attendees were invited to sign the base of the display, to show their support for the bid.   Next to it stood a five-tier cake by Charly’s Bakery, which reflected different aspects of Cape Town.   in the exhibition hall one can loosely pick up a grouping of similar designers, including furniture, fashion, jewellery, craft, interior design, product design, advertising, architecture, publishing and many more design disciplines.

The furniture exhibits probably attracted the most attention, because the exhibitors required more space, and they tended to not be confined within exhibition stand walls.  I was impressed by the differentness of an outdoors chair made from pipes (left), as well as the new stainless steel tub chair from the Sofa Studio in Franschhoek.  Other furniture designers at the Expo include the Western Cape Furniture Initiative, Haldane Martin, Cabinetworks, Pierre Cronje, Raw Studios, Recreate, Pedersen + Lennard, …XYZ Design, and a most cleverly named Flower Power, making lamps shaped like proteas. 

The 24 jewellery stands probably were the most popular in general, attracting a lot of visitors.  The work exhibited was more modern and contemporary, some quirky, very creative, some art, some organic, some romantic, and all unique and non-commercialised.  The University of Stellenbosch Jewellery Design department also exhibited its students’ work.  Ceramic exhibitors include Liesel Trautman, Diana Ferreira, fun Zizamele Ceramics, John Bauer, The Potter’s Workshop, Tamarillo Ceramics & Design, Clementina Ceramics,  Hennie Meyer Ceramics, Imiso Ceramics, Sootcookie Ceramics, Tania Babb Ceramics and Wonki Ware.   Craft exhibitors include Woodhead’s, Usisi Designs, Cupcake Country, The Cape Craft & Design Institute, Phumani Paper, Design Afrika, Monkeybiz, The Letterpress Company,  Nicfredman Art and Design, Molten, The Beloved, and many more.   Fashion took up a lot of exhibition space, and was popular.  Exhibitors include Tjerrie, Matblac, GOOD Clothing, Coast & Koi, Spilt Milk, BlueCollarWhiteCollar, Homework, Mielie, Township Patterns, DURCHZUG, FACT, Baie Nice, Continent Africa, and MeMeMe.   Lifestyle designers exhibiting are Pepper Plum Designs, Yda Walt Studio, Flick Glass, Fundi Light & Living, Carrol Boyes, Chic Revolution, Tintown, Anatomy Design, and Ikhaya.  Some of the names of the designer businesses are as creative as their craft!

There are two separated design areas within the Design Indaba Expo.  The first is The Salon Privé, ‘focusing on the crème de la crème of South African design.  The Salon Privé is independently curated and designers are encouraged to use the platform to launch a new product or product range.’    In this space the Ardmore ceramics table attracted attention, as did the Veuve Clicquot champagne bar, where I indulged in a glass of their Rosé bubbly at R99, served in a most beautiful unusual champagne glass, nothing like I have ever seen before, without a stem.     Other exhibitors are architects Haldane Martin, Johannesburg-based interior designers Tonic (which one hopes will open in Cape Town too), Willowlamp, Zenzulu, Egg Designs, Ronel Jordaan, ZENZULU, and more.  Close by was a collection of small stands dedicated to “Emerging Creatives”, but it is not explained in the Visitors Guide, other than that there are 60 first-time exhibitors, under the heading “New Kids on the Block”.  The Department of Trade and Industry also had a conglomerate pavilion with about ten exhibitors, including Abode Designer, Veldt designers, Zan Zan décor, Drift Furniture, Keiskamma Art, Master Wires and Deesigned Beads.

For the hungry and thirsty Expo-goers, one can buy Woolworths’ coffees and rolls, or buy sandwiches and other foods from the Earth Fair Market.   Grolsch has an interestingly designed stand too.   Whilst I sat down at the table to have my cappuccino, I had the most wonderful experience in reconnecting with Mark Robinson, whom I had last seen twenty years ago when we both consulted to the then Colman Foods.  The lady that took his seat when he left shared a background in PR and marketing with me.   This was another enriching dimension of the Expo. 

Alongside the Design Indaba Expo is the update of the Cape Town Design Route, and this is an exciting longer-term manifestation of Cape Town’s design wealth, in that tourists and locals can visit more than fifty designers in the city throughout the year.   The Cape Town Design Route designers are all exhibiting at the Design Indaba Expo.  The updated Cape Town Design Route 2011 map was lying at the entrance to the exhibition, without one being alerted to this wonderful design highlight.  I had read about the Design Route by chance last year, and this is the first time that I have seen a map for it.  I was so inspired about the Cape Town Design Route at the time that I wrote a blogpost about it, and will write a new one about the Cape Town Design Route 2011.

Film and fashion events take place inside the Expo throughout the exhibition days, and the programme of events is detailed in the Visitors’ Guide.   Childrens’ design and art workshops are also on the programme throughout the weekend.   

Last year the Design Indaba became infamous due to the spectacle Martha Stewart made of herself as the keynote speaker at the Design Indaba Conference – this year the Design Indaba will be remembered for the most wonderful showcase of design in Cape Town!

Design Indaba Expo, Cape Town International Convention Centre, Cape Town.  Tel (021) 465-9966.  www.designindaba.com.  Today 10h00 – 20h00, Sunday 10h00 – 18h00.

Chris von Ulmenstein, Whale Cottage Portfolio: www.whalecottage.com  Twitter: @WhaleCottage

Restaurant Review: Buitenverwachting Asparagus Menu a good but expensive tip!

I had the pleasure of rediscovering Buitenverwachting about three weeks ago, having been invited to try their Sunday buffet lunch.  Whilst there, I had experienced chef Edgar Osojnik’s excellent cuisine, and therefore decided to return to try the Asparagus Menu, which runs until the end of November.

It was a lovely summer’s day and we sat on the terrace outside the restaurant, facing the Courtyard.  It was much quieter than on my previous visit, yet noisy from a field close by, where a sport’s day was being held.  

The Courtyard menu cover is made from black leather, is branded, and contains only a few pages, with four pages dedicated to the Asparagus special menu, costing R 260 for a 3-course meal plus a glass of Buitenverwaching Sauvignon Blanc or the Meifort.  It also contains a one-page Courtyard menu, being a mix of starters, mains and desserts, thus giving only a few options per course for non-asparagus eaters.

The Asparagus menu offers two standard asparagus dishes that one can order on an a la carte basis, either as a starter (R82) or as a main (R104) course.  Two choices are offered : with vinaigrette, offering olive oil, balsamico or truffle oil, and a baguette; and with a selection of sauces, being hollandaise, butter, Mornay, or Béarnaise, with parsley potato.   Other asparagus starter options range from R75 – R110, and are asparagus served with potato and an onion salad;  asparagus served with quail;  asparagus with parma ham; and asparagus with baby chicken.   Main courses are expensive, ranging between R145 – R165, and choices are asparagus served with salmon trout gnocchi, hanger steak, veal involtini, ravioli espuma, or with grilled line fish.  One of the desserts is served with asparagus, also containing rhubarb and strawberry gratin, and is served with saffron honey ice cream, at R69.

I could not get the waitress to explain to me exactly how the asparagus and linefish dish is served, and the French restaurant hostess came to assist, being very professional with her care of our table.  The waitress, by contrast, sulked the minute we said that we did not understand her reply about how the asparagus is served.   The hostess was able to offer a compromise, and Chef Edgar made a special dish with a most wonderful firm piece of kingklip, a parsley potato, and crunchy steamed white and green asparagus topped with the most outstanding deep yellow Hollandaise Sauce, at R156.  I savoured it slowly, to enjoy every bit of the wonderful taste.

My son is not an asparagus fan, and ordered the Entrecote steak with porcini dauphinoise at R152, and proclaimed it to be excellent, tender, and with a wonderful taste due to the shallot sauce on the steak.   Asparagus is one of the vegetables that comes with the dish, and a large thin fried potato slice added a lovely design touch to the presentation.    

Other Courtyard menu options are a caeser salad served with anchovies and salmon (R95), a vegetable tian served with sorbet, smoked onion puree and crostini (R73), and Sissy’s open sandwich (R44).  We were served an amuse bouche, which looked very attractive in its presentation, but was not really special in terms of its content, being two minute slices of Buffalo Mozzarella (looking like a quail egg slice at first, being so tiny) and a grapeseed Peperonata terrine with a minute panfried crostini, on top of which was a tiny drop of chippollini puree – a mouthful of a description for something that wasn’t!   Dessert options are rhubarb and ice cream, and Kardinalschnitte, a mousse cake slice.  

If one chooses to sit inside, or comes for dinner, one is offered the Nuptials Menu, a very clever name for the menu which pairs food and wine, but is even more expensive.  The menu is a very restricted one in terms of number of choices, but is beautifully presented, in a black leather cover too, with cards that can be changed as the menu changes.  So, for example, a starter Buffalo Mozarella and peperonata terrine is paired with Buitenverwachting’s Buiten Blanc at R20 per 125 ml glassful.  A Curry Leaf pan-fried langoustine-scallop starter at R 195 was paired with a Jordan Riesling at R25.  A veal main course costs R215, and is paired with  Whalehaven Pinot Noir at R35.  A Raspberry soufflé costs R55 and a chocolate variation R85, both paired with Buitenverwachting 1769 at R35 for 75ml.

I was shocked at the wine prices, not having seen them on my last visit.   While the Buitenverwachting Buiten Blanc costs R45 in the wine shop a few meters away, it costs R120 on the winelist, and R40 per 250ml glassful; the Chardonnay costs R85/260; the Sauvignon Blanc R60/R180; the Meifort R60/R175; the Merlot R65/R195; the Cabernet Sauvignon R80/R245, and the Christine R160/R485.  The Buitenverwachting Buiten Brut costs R272, and other MCC brands appear very expensive, with Pierre Jourdan Belle Rosé costing R383, Graham Beck Brut R474 and High Constantia Clos André Cuvee Brut R479.   Moët & Chandon costs from R990, Veuve Cliquot R1020 and Krug Grand Cuvee R2335.  Imported wines are from France (R761 and up), Italy (including a Barolo at R1218), and Australia, the USA and New Zealand (more reasonably priced between R342 – R583).  Shiraz wines on the winelist are Boland at R279, Glen Carlou (each vintage costing a different price, most expensive being 2004 at R410), Kevin Arnold at R320, Anatu at R280 and The Foundry at R301.  

When I saw the bill, and the cost of the cappuccino in particular, at R26, it really hit home to me how expensive Buitenverwachting is.  I have not drunk such an expensive coffee elsewhere in Cape Town.  Buitenverwachting cannot be faulted in terms of its gourmet cuisine, but one pays a high price for it, positioning it at the well-heeled Constantia set as well as international tourists.  The Sunday Buffet lunch is however excellent value at R240 for the four course meal.

We popped into the wine shop/wine tasting room after the lunch, and in fact did not see that its entrance was in the Courtyard.   It was quite disappointing – it is quite a large room with comfortable seating, looking much like someone’s lounge but not with much class, and display cases for the wines, as well as jewellery made by the wife of the  Buitenverwachting GM Lars Maack.  Given the quality of the wines and the restaurant, I was shocked to see the chap behind the counter wear a Billabong T-shirt and what looked like a swimming costume.  I left with a bottle of Buitenverwachting Meifort wine, having tasted it at the Sunday  Buffet lunch, at a cost of R60.

Buitenverwachting, Klein Constantia Road, Constantia, www.buitenverwachting.com. Tel (021) 794-3522.  Monday – Saturday lunch and dinner, Sunday Buffet lunch. Corkage R55.

Chris von Ulmenstein, Whale Cottage Portfolio: www.whalecottage.com Twitter: @WhaleCottage

City of Cape Town launches Cape Town Design Route

Cape Town is bidding to become the Design Capital 2014,  and already has earned a reputation for its design strengths, being the home of the highly successful annual Design Indaba, and hosting the annual advertising industry Loerie Awards event for the second year running. 

Cape Town also is known for its artisic and design talent, and therefore the City of Cape Town has created a Cape Town Design Route.  It is a wonderful asset for the city, and we question why it has not been introduced to tourism players, why it has not been packaged in the form of maps which can be handed out to visitors to the city, and why it is not being marketed by the City of Cape Town’s marketing agency Cape Town Tourism!   It is a shame too that the Design Route feature in the Hello Festive Season 2010/2011 publication contains so many errors! 

The Cape Town Design Route includes the following: 

Monkey Biz:   probably the best known of all artists and crafts, this bead project has 450 women employed as bead artists. 65 Rose Street, Bo-Kaap. Tel (021) 426-0145

Bokkie Shoes:   make shoes from 100 % cotton shew-shew print. Sold at Loud on Long, 43 Long Street.

Amulet:   Gerika Langenhoven and Elizabeth van der Merwe make hand-crafted jewellery.  14 Kloofnek Road, Tamboerskloof.  Tel (021) 426-1149

Carrol Boyes:   Also very well-known, make up-market homeware and table top items in pewter and silver.  Outlet in V&A Waterfront.  Tel (021) 424-8263

Continent Africa:   A think tank focused on learning about politics, economics and charity, T-shirt sales funding the work.  No contact details.

Cupcake Country:  Provide sewing kits to make bright crafted cupcakes.  10A Jagersfontein Lane, Oranjezicht.

freeRange Jewels:   Marele Lamprecht and her team translate objects from nature into jewellery. Cape Quarter.  Tel (021) 423-1524

Give it Bag:   Make bags from polypropylene bags, in bold fashion statements. Canterbury Studios, Unit 4, 35 Wesley Street, Gardens.  Tel (021) 465-9852

Lalesso:   a fashion brand inspired by the ‘khanga’ from Kenya.  Tel (021) 424-5565

Streetwires Artist Collective:  Make wire and bead craft-art.  Tel (021) 426-2475

Township Patterns:   Cotton bags and fabric prints made by women from Khayelitsha reflect the day-to-day life in the townships.

Urbanative Fine Jewels:   Jewellery is made and goldsmith hobby classes and workshops offered. Gold of Africa Museum, 96 Strand Street. 

African Allsorts:   handmade bead and wire artwork.   4 Briar Street, Salt River.  Tel (021) 447-6976

Design Africa:   Hand-woven baskets, textiles and adornments made from organic materials, as well as with plastic, leather and glass.

Firepetals:   Hand-crafted jewellery with contemporary South African flair. 59 Roodebloem Street, Woodstock. Tel (021) 447-2025.

Frieda Luhl Jewellery:   Frieda incorporates natural materials in her jewellery design, framed in silver. 30 Roodebloem Road, Woodstock. Tel (021) 447-5757.

Heath Nash:   creates eco-friendly items out of other people’s rubbish.  2 Mountain Road, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 447-5757.

Haldane Martin:   Furniture designer.  12 Aberdeen Street, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 448-0999.

Helen Vaughn Ceramics:   Contemporary ceramics.  10 Oxford Road, Observatory.  Tel (021) 447-3966  

The New Basket Workshop:  Baskets made in rural areas.  42 Hares Road, Woodstock.  tel (021) 448-9761

Mu & Me:   Stationery range based on a group of friends who live on Orange Hill. The Old Biscuit Mill, 373 Albert Road, Woodstock. Tel (021) 447-1413

Imiso Ceramics:   Modern Africa-inspired ceramics.  Old Biscuit Mill, 373 Albert Road, Woodstock.  tel (021) 447-7668

Moonbasket:   Make lampshades and home accessories.  Woodstock Industrial Centre, 66 Albert Road, Woodstock.  

Pedersen + Lennard:   Lighting, storage and other design.  45 Yew Street, Salt River.  Tel (021) 447-2020.

Soulchild:   Highly styled fashion brand.  30 Brabant Road, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 448-8777

Sway:   Ladies’ clothing is made from hand-drawn images silk screened onto fabric.   68 Albert Road, Woodstock.  Tel (021) 447-5999

Trademark Designs:  Picture frames made from hot-dipped galvanised iron.   Unit 13, Ravenscraig Mews, Ravenscraig Road, Woodstock.

Chris von Ulmenstein, Whale Cottage Portfolio:  www.whalecottage.com Twitter: @WhaleCottage